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Women Relief Workers

Description

Images of female relief workers who were caring for sick and wounded during the evacuation through Fredericksburg and Belle Plain in May 1864.

Collector(s)

The Woolsey sisters, members of a New York family, all became involved in relief work when the war started. Abby Woolsey, Jane Woolsey, Mary Howland, and Eliza Howland all spent time working in hospitals, in the field, or with the Hospital Transport…

Cornelia Hancock, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was active at the United States General Hospitals in Philadelphia, where she learned to care for wounds. She cared for wounded at Gettysburg, and upon hearing news of the battles of the 1864 campaign,…

Abigail Hopper Gibbons, a member of an influential New York City family, spent much of her life involved in philanthropist, charity, and reform activities. She started work with the army in autumn 1861. She and her daughter, Sarah Hopper Gibbons …

Emelina Pheiades Keeler Spencer, a resident of Oswego, New York, began relief work when her husband R. H. Spencer enlisted in the army following Antietam. As a result, she became a state relief agent for New York, associated with her husband’s…

Sarah “Aunt Becky” Palmer was a young widowed woman with two children at the start of the war. She left her hometown of Ithaca, New York in the spring of 1862 to follow two of her brothers, who had joined the 109th New York Volunteers.…